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26 Mar 2015 
Cord Cutting: How To Decide If It's Time To Ditch Cable For Streaming Video








cord cutters Netflix: $8.99/month For less than $10 a month, Netflix gives its users access to a boatload of movies, television series and original content such as House of Cards and Orange is the New Black. While more content is added each month, Netflix can often lack some of the newer content available on other services and finding the hidden gems can sometimes require the use of external guides such as Instant Watcher . Hulu Plus: $7.99/month If new television shows are the staple of your TV-watching experience, Hulu Plus can serve as a decent replacement, offering some of the newest episodes from major networks including Fox, NBC Universal, ABC and the CW. Its one major drawback is the number of ads that you have to sit through, regardless of whether or not you pay for the service. Sling TV $20/month For $20 a month, Dish Networks Sling TV offers 17 live television channels and is the only service to also include ESPN and ESPN2. And with that price users can stream live TV on a tablet, smartphone, laptop, Xbox One and select set-top boxes such as the Amazon Fire TV and Roku. Additional channel bundles can also be added for $5 a month and fully loaded it can bring the monthly cost as high as $45. While its one of the cheaper cable-free television options, the service lacks some frills of television watching such as a DVR service. Apple Streaming TV: $30-40/month While a full-blown Apple TV hardware replacement has yet to appear, Apple is working on developing its own TV streaming service , according to the Wall Street Journal. ABC, CBS and Fox are among some of the networks in talks with the company.
Full story here: Cord Cutting: How To Decide If It's Time To Ditch Cable For Streaming Video








However, the actual numbers show that if the cord-cutting revolution is happening, then someone must have hit the mute button. In 2014, the pay -TV industry lost 125,000 subscriptions, up from 2013, when 95,000 customers cut the cord, according to a post on telecompaper.com that cites a report from Leichtman Research Group. Yes, consumers are walking away from cable and satellite TV, but they are exiting one at a time, not in droves. The pay-TV industry still counts more than 95 million subscribers on its rolls, so last year's exodus marks a decline of barely over 0.1%, or essentially a rounding error. What is happening in the industry, however, is that actual viewing of cable TV is plummeting. Total TV viewing fell by 10% in the third quarter of 2014 and 9% in the fourth quarter, according to Sanford & Bernstein analysis of Nielsen data.That decline has hastened in the new year as viewership has fallen 12% thus far in the first quarter. The Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, which would seem to represent the constituency most threatened by the shift, reportedly estimates that 40% of the Q3 and Q4 decline owes to competition from streaming services like Netflix,according to a Wall Street Journal article [subscription required]. That should come as little surprise considering Netflix's domestic subscription base has grown by nearly 20% in the last year, but what is surprising is that this transition hasn't led to much cord-cutting. Let's take a look at a few reasons why. Can't mess with the bundle While the frivolous reality TV shows that have become a staple of the past decade seem to be losing their relevance as consumer tastes have moved to serialized scripted shows such as Netflix's House of Cards or Showtime's Homeland, the most popular programming on cable still requires a subscription. Disney 's ESPN is far and away the leading cable network and, with the exception of Dish 's Sling TV, there is no substitute for live sports without a pay-TV package. Sling TV, which offers ESPN, TNT, TBS, and a handful of other popular cable channels, seems like a good deal for $20/month, but initial sign-ups were reported to be only around 100,000 in the first month. At that level, Sling poses no serious threat to the cable giants.
Read More: Why Americans Are Giving Up on Cable TV but Not Cutting the Cord - NASDAQ.com








So the Cooking Channel and Crime & Investigation Network and dozens of others at the cord cutting upper end of the channel array hardly fatten up cable bills at all. Savings certainly can be had through narrower packages or a la carte selections for those who have no interest in sports. Walt Disney Co.s ( DIS ) ESPN alone collects more than $6 per month per subscriber four times the next most expensive network, Time Warner Inc.s ( TWX ) TNT. ESPN 2, Fox Sports 1 and NFL Network are also among the priciest channels, as games command a reliable real-time audience and must pay enormous rights fees to the professional and college leagues. The point is, if you want to pay less, its possible but you have to be willing to watch less. Or, more specifically, you need to know exactly what you will want to watch and thus to forgo the serendipity of channel surfing or the chance that some obscure network will create next seasons cant-miss show. There are handy shopping guides to test out whether youre a good candidate for cord cutting, such as this one from the Associated Press . More competition or heightened demand? Some enthusiastic advocates for greater competition across video platforms believe we might ultimately see broader price reductions as the cable-and-content ecosystem is disrupted. The argument here is that content costs those fees to ESPN and the others have grown well in excess of inflation in part because the pay-TV middlemen (like Time Warner Cable and Comcast) were always able to pass them on to their captive subscribers. So, these experts say, perhaps disconnecting content fees from dominant cable and satellite systems will make them more susceptible to price competition as the networks scramble to chase the eyeballs of cord cutters. Maybe. But wont the wider variety of services bidding to carry the coveted networks simply broaden the demand for them? Isnt content still king, under this scenario? For sure, Apple seems perfectly equipped to drive a tough bargain in negotiating content fees. And its TV solution might deliver additional benefits. Maybe it will offer a handy tool to search and organize YouTube videos?
Read More: Cutting the cable cord might not save you as much as you think - Yahoo News



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25 Mar 2015 
Why Americans Are Giving Up On Cable Tv But Not Cutting The Cord - Nasdaq.com








The Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, which would seem to represent the constituency most threatened by the shift, reportedly estimates that 40% of the Q3 and Q4 decline owes to competition from streaming services like Netflix,according to a Wall Street Journal article [subscription required]. That should come as little surprise considering Netflix's domestic subscription base has grown by nearly 20% in the last year, but what is surprising is that this transition hasn't led to much cord-cutting. Let's take a look at a few reasons why. Can't mess with the bundle While the frivolous reality TV shows that have become a staple of the past decade seem to be losing their relevance as consumer tastes have moved to serialized scripted shows such as Netflix's House of Cards or Showtime's Homeland, the most popular programming on cable still requires a subscription. Disney 's ESPN is far and away the leading cable network and, with the exception of Dish 's Sling TV, there is no substitute for live sports without a pay-TV package. Sling TV, which offers ESPN, TNT, TBS, and a handful of other popular cable channels, seems like a good deal for $20/month, but initial sign-ups were reported to be only around 100,000 in the first month. At that level, Sling poses no serious threat to the cable giants. Similarly, Time Warner 's HBO and CBS 's Showtime currently require a pay-TV subscription, though that will soon change, but the need to have a cable or satellite subscription to enjoy premium channels has probably kept many Americans tied to their pay-TV providers. Even with the over-the-top subscriptions, consumers will not save money compared to adding them to their cable packages, and HBO's agreement to make the HBO Now debut exclusive to Apple products shows that the rollout will be incremental, meaning the initial effect will be subdued. Finally, there are still plenty of popular shows on cable news networks and other channels like Comedy Central that are best consumed with a traditional subscription package. For many Americans, being a regular viewer of one or two shows or channels is enough of a reason to keep the cord. The other bundle Cable services are also often tied to Internet and landline phones, which make cutting the cord more difficult.
Source: Why Americans Are Giving Up on Cable TV but Not Cutting the Cord - NASDAQ.com







Cord Cutting: How To Decide If It's Time To Ditch Cable For Streaming Video




Netflix: $8.99/month For less than $10 a month, Netflix gives its users access to a boatload of movies, television series and original content such as House of Cards and Orange is the New Black. While more content is added each month, Netflix can often lack some of the newer content available on other services and finding the hidden gems can sometimes require the use of external guides such as Instant Watcher . Hulu Plus: $7.99/month If new television shows are the staple of your TV-watching experience, Hulu Plus can serve as a decent replacement, offering some of the newest episodes from major networks including Fox, NBC Universal, ABC and the CW. Its one major drawback is the number of ads that you have to sit through, regardless of whether or not you pay for the service. Sling TV $20/month For $20 a month, Dish Networks Sling TV offers 17 live television channels and is the only service to also include ESPN and ESPN2. And with that price users can stream live TV on a tablet, smartphone, laptop, Xbox One and select set-top boxes such as the Amazon Fire TV and Roku. Additional channel bundles can also be added for $5 a month and fully loaded it can bring the monthly cost as high as $45. While its one of the cheaper cable-free television options, the service lacks some frills of television watching such as a DVR service. Apple Streaming TV: $30-40/month While a full-blown Apple TV hardware replacement has yet to appear, Apple is working on developing its own TV streaming service , according to the Wall Street Journal. ABC, CBS and Fox are among some of the networks in talks with the company. But NBCUniversal is not involved.
Source: http://www.ibtimes.com/cord-cutting-how-decide-if-its-time-ditch-cable-streaming-video-1851560







Cutting the cable cord might not save you as much as you think - Yahoo News




PlayStation Vue has launched in Chicago, New York and Philadelphia for the PS3 and PS4. It is accessible through Sony ( SNE ) PlayStation consoles and offers the kind of TV bundle that cable companies sell. Vue delivers TV over the Internet to PlayStation consoles. It comes with a DVR-like service and lets customers watch both live programming and on-demand shows. You can watch more than 80 channels on Vue, but you'll have to pay more for certain stations. For $50 a month, you'll get 53 cord cutting channels, including CBS, Fox, NBC, Bravo, CNN, Comedy Central, the Food Network, MTV, Nickelodeon and TNT. At $60 a month, you get access to a small handful of local sports networks, including New York's YES and the Big Ten Network. And for $70 a month, you'll be able to stream 26 more channels, such as FXM, Logo and Sprout. Notably, Disney ( DIS )-owned channels, including ABC and ESPN, are not currently available on the PlayStation. Sony has been t esting the service since November , and it expects to launch Vue more widely in the coming weeks and months. Though Sony was among the first companies to announce a cable-like package over the Internet, it finds itself entering a suddenly crowded field of similar services. Dish Network ( DISH ) launched its $20-a-month Sling TV service last month, featuring 17 channels, including ESPN, AMC, the Food Network and CNN. It doesn't provide access to local programming or broadcast networks, however.
Red the full story at: http://money.cnn.com/2015/03/19/technology/sony-playstation-vue/index.html?section=money_latest







Sony launches $50 Vue cord-cutting service - Mar. 19, 2015




So the Cooking Channel and Crime & Investigation Network and dozens of others at the upper end of the channel array hardly fatten up cable bills at all. Savings certainly can be had through narrower packages or a la carte selections for those who have no interest in sports. Walt Disney Co.s ( DIS ) ESPN alone collects more than $6 per month per subscriber four times the next most expensive network, Time Warner Inc.s ( TWX ) TNT. ESPN 2, Fox Sports 1 and NFL Network are also among the priciest channels, as games command a reliable real-time audience and must pay enormous rights fees to the professional and college leagues. The point is, if you want to pay less, its possible but you have to be willing to watch less. Or, more specifically, you need to know exactly what you will want to watch and thus to forgo the serendipity of channel surfing or the chance that some obscure network will create next seasons cant-miss show. There are handy shopping guides to test out whether youre a good candidate for cord cutting, such as this one from the Associated Press . More competition or heightened demand? Some enthusiastic advocates for greater competition across video platforms believe we might ultimately see broader price reductions as the cable-and-content ecosystem is disrupted. The argument here is that content costs those fees to ESPN and the others have grown well in excess of inflation in part because the pay-TV middlemen (like Time Warner Cable and Comcast) were always able to pass them on to their captive subscribers. So, these experts say, perhaps disconnecting content fees from dominant cable and satellite systems will make them more susceptible to price competition as the networks scramble to chase the eyeballs of cord cutters. Maybe. But wont the wider variety of services bidding to carry the coveted networks simply broaden the demand for them? Isnt content still king, under this scenario? For sure, Apple seems perfectly equipped to drive a tough bargain in negotiating content fees. And its TV solution might deliver additional benefits. Maybe it will offer a handy tool to search and organize YouTube videos? The ability to access ones TV programming on an Apple device anywhere will also be a huge bonus for many and well worth the $30 to $40 monthly cost. cord cutters Yet the greatest impact of all these trimmer video packages might not be in enticing existing all-inclusive cable subscribers to abandon the bundle.
Full story here: Cutting the cable cord might not save you as much as you think - Yahoo News



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25 Mar 2015 
Why Apple's Newest Key Market Is Cord-cutters








They will have to pay dearly to get sports channels. With cable you also have the ease of not needing any hardware beyond what the cable company provides to watch your preferred shows and channels on a TV set. In comparison, PlayStation Vue requires a PlayStation 4 game console, and Sling works only with Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Microsoft's Xbox One. Why To Cut The Cord And Go Streaming While cable offers hundreds of channels to choose from, that might not matter for most Americans. The U.S. home with a TV receives an average of 189 channels, but viewers consistently watch an average of only 17, according to a Nielsen study from 2014. For those who can live without every channel under the sun, streaming television and on-demand video can be a much better deal. For example, subscribing to Sling TV and HBO Now comes out to about $78 with the same Internet plan, netting a savings of $36 a month compared to the $114 premium cable package. And even with the addition of Netflix it still comes out cheaper. In addition to streaming services, TV watchers can also opt for an HD antenna, which picks up broadcasts in major metropolitan areas. Youll still get all the basic local channels and the HD stream can often be better than cable. So there are plenty of savings to be had, but users will need to be smart on how they combine subscription services to get the best value if they choose to cut the cord. Take a look below for all the options you can choose from: CBS All-Access: $5.99/month CBS All-Access provides users with the entire back catalog of CBS classic shows as well as a number of its current series such as The Big Bang Theory and Hawaii Five-O. It also provides live CBS TV in some markets, except for NFL Sunday games due to league licensing restrictions. But at $5.99 per month, the service will be of most value to CBS fans.
Source: http://www.ibtimes.com/cord-cutting-how-decide-if-its-time-ditch-cable-streaming-video-1851560







Why Americans Are Giving Up on Cable TV but Not Cutting the Cord - NASDAQ.com




households have broadband Internet but no pay-TV subscription, said a report last month by Experian Marketing Services. That's 7.3 percent of households, up from 4.2 percent in 2010. Cord-cutting is concentrated among young people13.5 percent of broadband households with an adult under 35 have no pay TV. It is concentrated further among people who own smartphones and especially iPhones, Experian said. Millennials are almost four times more likely than other adults to watch streaming video on a TV. The key thing determining whether a household cancels its cable is whether its members like to watch streaming video on their TV rather than on a handheld device or computer, Experian said. Netflix or Hulu Plus (which is owned by a consortium, including Disney, 21st Century Fox and CNBC parent NBC Universal ) subscribers are almost 25 percent more likely to cut the cord, since they can get most of their TV from those subscription services, which are cheaper than a full cable package. More than a third of U.S. households now own an Internet-connected TV, the report added. 3. Who else is pushing cord-cutting?
Red the full story at: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102512659








The pay-TV industry still counts more than 95 million subscribers on its rolls, so last year's exodus marks a decline of barely over 0.1%, or essentially a rounding error. What is happening in the industry, however, is that actual viewing of cable TV is plummeting. Total TV viewing fell by 10% in the third quarter of 2014 and 9% in the fourth quarter, according to Sanford & Bernstein analysis of Nielsen data.That decline has hastened in the new year as viewership has fallen 12% thus far in the first quarter. The Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, which would seem to represent the constituency most threatened by the shift, reportedly estimates that 40% of the Q3 and Q4 decline owes to competition from streaming services like Netflix,according to a Wall Street Journal article [subscription required]. That should come as little surprise considering Netflix's domestic subscription base has grown by nearly 20% in the last year, but what is surprising is that this transition hasn't led to much cord-cutting. Let's take a look at a few reasons why. Can't mess with the bundle While the frivolous reality TV shows that have become a staple of the past decade seem to be losing their relevance as consumer tastes have moved to serialized scripted shows such as Netflix's House of Cards or Showtime's Homeland, the most popular programming on cable still requires a subscription. Disney 's ESPN is far and away the leading cable network and, with the exception of Dish [source] 's Sling TV, there is no substitute for live sports without a pay-TV package. Sling TV, which offers ESPN, TNT, TBS, and a handful of other popular cable channels, seems like a good deal for $20/month, but initial sign-ups were reported to be only around 100,000 in the first month. At that level, Sling poses no serious threat to the cable giants. Similarly, Time Warner 's HBO and CBS 's Showtime currently require a pay-TV subscription, though that will soon change, but the need to have a cable or satellite subscription to enjoy premium channels has probably kept many Americans tied to their pay-TV providers.
Source: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/why-americans-are-giving-up-on-cable-tv-but-not-cutting-the-cord-cm457355



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24 Mar 2015 
Why Americans Are Giving Up On Cable Tv But Not Cutting The Cord - Nasdaq.com







cord cutting

Why Apple's newest key market is cord-cutters




Total TV viewing fell by 10% in the third quarter of 2014 and 9% in the fourth quarter, according to Sanford & Bernstein analysis of Nielsen data.That decline has hastened in the new year as viewership has fallen 12% thus far in the first quarter. The Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, which would seem to represent the constituency most threatened by the shift, reportedly estimates that 40% of the Q3 and Q4 decline owes to competition from streaming services like Netflix,according to a Wall Street Journal article [subscription required]. That should come as little surprise considering Netflix's domestic subscription base has grown by nearly 20% in the last year, but what is surprising is that this transition hasn't led to much cord-cutting. Let's take a look at a few reasons why. Can't mess with the bundle While the frivolous reality TV shows that have become a staple of the past decade seem to be losing their relevance as consumer tastes have moved to serialized scripted shows such as Netflix's House of Cards or Showtime's Homeland, the most popular programming on cable still requires a subscription. Disney 's ESPN is far and away the leading cable network and, with the exception of Dish 's Sling TV, there is no substitute for live sports without a pay-TV package. Sling TV, which offers ESPN, TNT, TBS, and a handful of other popular cable channels, seems like a good deal for $20/month, but initial sign-ups were reported to be only around 100,000 in the first month. At that level, Sling poses no serious threat to the cable giants. Similarly, Time Warner 's HBO and CBS 's Showtime currently require a pay-TV subscription, though that will soon change, but the need to have a cable or satellite subscription to enjoy premium channels has probably kept many Americans tied to their pay-TV providers.
Read More: Why Americans Are Giving Up on Cable TV but Not Cutting the Cord - NASDAQ.com








2. How many people are cutting the cord? About 8.6 million U.S. households have broadband Internet but no pay-TV subscription, said a report last month by Experian Marketing Services. That's 7.3 percent of households, up from 4.2 percent in 2010. Cord-cutting is concentrated among young people13.5 percent of broadband households with an adult under 35 have no pay TV. It is concentrated further among people who own smartphones and especially iPhones, Experian said. Millennials are almost four times more likely than other adults to watch streaming video on a TV. The key thing determining whether a household cancels its cable is whether its members like to watch streaming video on their TV rather than on a handheld device or computer, Experian said. Netflix or Hulu Plus (which is owned by a consortium, including Disney, 21st Century Fox and CNBC parent NBC Universal ) subscribers are almost 25 percent more likely to cut the cord, since they can get most of their TV from those subscription services, which are cheaper than a full cable package. More than a third of U.S. households now own an Internet-connected TV, the report added. 3.
Read More: Why Apple's newest key market is cord-cutters



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24 Mar 2015 
Why Apple's Newest Key Market Is Cord-cutters








's Fox. The move is a huge shot across the bow of cable TV operators, since the service would be a big boost to a fast-growing but poorly understood industry phenomenoncord-cutting. Cord-cutting is when a household decides to get its video, including TV, over the Internet rather than from traditional cable or satellite TV providers. As it becomes more common, it stands to reshuffle household video budgets and viewing patterns and remake the power relationships between companies that make programming and those that distribute it. And with the power goes the money, in the form of fees paid by consumers or the money that distributors pay to programmers. What will all this mean? Will consumers save money? And why is the change accelerating now? Here are answers to 8 key questions. Donald Iain Smith | Flickr | Getty Images 1. How much do people pay for cable? Market researchers at NPD Group estimate that the average cable bill, now about $123 a month, will reach $200 by 2020. A separate study by the Federal Communications Commission found that so-called "expanded basic" cable, excluding premium sports tiers and pay-movie services, like Time Warner 's Home Box Office, costs about $64 a month.
Full story here: Why Apple's newest key market is cord-cutters







Why Americans Are Giving Up on Cable TV but Not Cutting the Cord - NASDAQ.com




For many Americans, being a regular viewer of one or two shows or channels is enough of a reason to keep the cord. The other bundle Cable services are also often tied to Internet and landline phones, which make cutting the cord more difficult. So-called Triple Play services keep customers locked in by providing a lower rate than the sum of its parts. Though customers are often dissatisfied with the lack of transparency in triple play rates, as stand-alone rates for the individual services are not often provided, most have stuck with the packages. Indeed, cable and Internet providers such as Comcast and Time Warner Cable regularly rank among the most-hated companies in the country. Yet, consumers seem to have a hard time breaking up with them despite the ever-improving options. Old habits die hard it's said, and research has shown that the average American spends at least five hours a day in front of the tube. Even Netflix's biggest hit will have trouble beating that.That dependency has allowed cable companies to consistently raise prices nearly four times above the inflation rate for the last 15 years without losing customers. Finally, the recent jolt to the economy in the form of a falling unemployment rate and lower gas prices may also be keeping more Americans glued to the cord despite consumption declines as money is not as tight for many American households as it was a few years earlier. The true test for the pay-TV empire is likely to come this year when HBO, Showtime, and others launch stand-alone over-the-top streaming services. Alternative options to traditional pay TV are certainly becoming more appealing, but cable's decline is more likely to resemble that of cigarettes rather than VCRs as bundling a bunch of stand-alone services may present more of a hassle to consumers without saving them much money. For forgotten channels on cable's second tier, like MTV, the verdict is in -- America doesn't need you.
Red the full story at: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/why-americans-are-giving-up-on-cable-tv-but-not-cutting-the-cord-cm457355







Cord Cutting: How To Decide If It's Time To Ditch Cable For Streaming Video




Dish Network launched Sling TV in January; Sony is launching PlayStation Vue in three cities this week; Apple is reportedly bring a TV service to Apple TV this summer. HBO , CBS and even the WWE (the pro wrestling organization) have all launched standalone Web subscriptions, no cable service required. But all of these services come at a cost, and when you start adding them all together it can easily cost as much or more than cable. So, how do you know if cutting the cable cord is right for you? It comes down to a pretty simple calculation: If you're a heavy TV viewer and like lots of options, the cable bundle is still probably the best option. But if you want a slimmed-down package with a few, but not all, options, and you're not a huge sports fan, streaming is probably right for you. Here's how to decide: Why To Stick With Cable If your household prefers to watch a wide variety of content, in some cases a premium cable subscription package can provide a better value. Take this scenario: A typical Time Warner Cable premium subscription package in New York, which includes over 200 channels, HBO and Internet, costs about $114 a month, with equipment costs for the first year, according official site to rates listed on the companys website. Creating a similar package would require subscriptions to several services: PlayStation Vue (starting at $49.99), HBO Now ($14.99/month) and Netflix ($8.99/month).
Source: http://www.ibtimes.com/cord-cutting-how-decide-if-its-time-ditch-cable-streaming-video-1851560



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